Blog Post 3

The Help shows us the inner workings of a segregated society against the backdrop of the growing US Civil Rights Movement in the 1960s. Although there is some variety in economic and social class, race is the number one determinant of a person’s place in Jackson, Mississippi. Race also determines who has access to educational, occupational, and economic opportunity. Racial tensions are high as white community members employ violence and coercion to try to keep the Civil Rights Movement from sweeping into their Mississippi town. At the same time, it shows us how, against all odds, Skeeter, a white woman, daughter of a cotton family, joins together with Aibileen and Minny, two black women who work as maids, to challenge the unfair practices that make the lives of the town’s black members so difficult.

When discussing hegemony, what comes to mind? Hegemony is the dominance one group has over another. In class, we talked about the movie, The Help. This movie covers the term hegemony very well. Not only was hegemony very prevalent in the movie, but so was microaggression. Microaggression is when there are comments against someone that indicate some kind of racism.

The Help, showed both of these terms. Throughout the movie, Skeeter, who is the main character, is sort of like the white savior for the film. Hollywood likes to put white actors and actresses in roles where they are portrayed as the “hero”. Hilly, another important character, tries to control the white women in Jackson, Mississippi, and holds tight to power through blackmail, and threats. Hilly fights to maintain power throughout the story. As a wealthy white woman in the South, she enjoys a position of great influence, but because her status is often maintained through bullying and threats.

Advertisement

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: